It’s National Dog Day!

In our home it’s always Dog day! But today’s the perfect excuse for all of us dog lovers to brag on ours.

CJ & Esme got to hang out with me at work today, meeting and greeting people and their dogs. CJ loves the people, Esme loves the dogs.

How did your dog(s) spend National Dog Day?

Freddie Mercury doesn’t really give a crap! He knows cats are superior.

The DNA Results are In…

Actually, I knew the results before I posted.  But you all realized that if you read my original post.

C.J.

Since he was about 5 months of age, which is approximately how old he was when he came into our lives, C.J. has been classified as a Lab Mix. He looked like he might have some semblance of a bully in him too, and probably several other breed mixes. Labrador retriever was the primary, stand-out phenotype. Chompers, C.J.’s namesake, was half lab and C.J. looked like a spitting image of Chompers so we figured it must be so.

C.J. has been living a lie for the last 13 years of his life…

Here are C.J.’s Royal Canin GHA results:

CJ’s Genetic Health Analysis Report

A Labrador Retriever mix he is NOT!  There’s probably a tiny bit in there somewhere according to his “mixed breed” analysis.  C.J. is the poster child of what a Mutt is.  He is a little bit of this, a little bit of that, a dash of this, a sprinkle of that, and peppered with about a dozen other breeds.  The miniature poodle part though?  That gets me rolling!  It explains all of his “princess” moments.

How awesome is that report?  This Genetic Health Analysis screens for over 140 different hereditary conditions.  Not only do I now know that C.J. is a Pitweiler Choodle, but he also has tested clear of over 140 hereditary conditions.  That’s something that sets this pet owner’s mind at ease.

Esme

Then there’s Esme.  She was the reason I wanted to give the Royal Canin GHA a try.  Namely because she was so young, I was curious to find out what she really was because she had some really peculiar behaviors.  I suspected she had some bully in her due to her appearance and her personality, but she had something else that I just couldn’t figure out.

Well, you already know how good my intuition about dog breeds is knowing C.J.’s results. Lab mix.  Pshaw.

Esme is very stand-offish with most of the new people she meets.  She is fearful of others, and there’s no correlation to her fearful behavior (sex, nationality, age).  However, if she is allowed time to get to know someone, she then adores them whole-heartedly.  She is also the epitome of a snuggler.  She loves to be held in your lap, loves to lay next to and half-way on you when you’re laying down, and will curl up next to you while you’re chilling on the couch watching television or reading a book.  She has the appetite of a starving bear and will eat anything and everything she can get into her mouth, even if it’s not intended for ingestion.  And her tracking ability is amazing.  I really need to see if she’d be interested in Nosework because she can definitely sniff out any critter that has passed through our yard.

She was adopted to me as a Pointer mix.  I could buy that easily by appearance alone, but especially after getting to know her.  She has the personality of a pointer, always has to be busy doing something!  She gets bored easily and has all the energy in the world.  She also has pointed a few times.  Most pointers I’ve ever met have been very friendly and personable.  Esme, not so much.  Don’t get me wrong, she is friendly and personable, but she lacks trust in strangers.  She needs to spend a little time getting to know you before she’ll trust you.  But once you’ve earned her trust, she’s all yours.

So, what the heck is she?  Here are Esme’s Royal Canin GHA results:

Esme’s Genetic Health Analysis Report

So, there you have it.  Esme is mostly American Staffordshire Terrier (a pit bull) with a side of Wild Dog.  I’m beginning to understand her more and more!  Her trust issues?  Now it makes sense.  Her snuggaliciousness?  That’s all pit bull!

SIDE NOTE:  Pit Bull is a generic term for any of the bull terrier breeds.  It’s an umbrella term for a Staffordshire Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, Bull Terrier, etc.  The term “Pit Bull” comes from the fact that many of these breeds were used as pit fighting dogs.  Funny thing is, most of them were bred to be nannies.  Hence the cuddling.  They were bred to protect the young while the adults tended to the daily activities of the household.

Again, a neat thing about the Royal Canin Genetic Health Analysis is that it screens for 140+ genetic mutations/diseases.  Esme’s test came back with one copy of the craniomandibular osteopathy mutation.  I have learned that this is a dominant disorder, so only one copy is required to develop symptoms which means Esme could develop this disease.  Not all dogs with the mutation show clinical signs, but at least now my vet and I know what to watch out for.

How to get your dog tested

Check with your veterinarian to see if they offer the Royal Canin Genetic Health Analysis. The test requires a small blood sample and is reasonably priced compared to other DNA tests for dogs, and you get so much more than just what your dogs’ primary breeds are!  Even if you have a purebred dog, it’s worth it to have it screened for the 140+ genetic mutations.

If you have a:

  1. mixed breed dog
  2. dog that came to you as a stray
  3. rescue dog

I think you should seriously consider testing them.  Even if they appear to be a particular breed or breed mix, you might be surprised!  C.J. looked so much like a Labrador Retriever mix that I was certain he had to have some in him as a dominant breed.  His results just go to show that looks can be deceiving.  Just do it!  It’s kind of fun!

What the heck happened to Kool Dogz?

During the summer months, I enjoy to eat and drink things that are ice cold. I enjoy ice cream, iced tea, frozen daiquiris and cold salads to name a few. It seems to help keep my body temperature at a comfortable level.

Why would dogs be any different? Actually, I think they might even appreciate ice cold treats more than I do since they (or most of them) are covered in a fur coat. I have made frozen treats (I like to call them Pupcicles) for my dogs for as long as I can remember. I like to take plain yogurt and mix it with whatever my dogs like (bananas, peanut butter, ground liver, cantaloupe, watermelon, … the possibilities are endless), then I put the mixture into a mold and freeze it. On hot days I pop a Pupcicle out of the mold and give it as a treat. CJ loves them! His favorite flavors are peanut/almond-butter & banana, cantaloupe, watermelon, fig, and berry (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, blackberry or any combination). I think he has a bit of a sweet tooth.

About 15 (or more) years ago I heard about this ice treat maker called Kool Dogz, manufactured by Premier Pet Products. I thought it was a pretty “kool” product myself, but never bought one because I was making my own pupcicles anyway.

Fast Forward 5+ Years: We moved from the Mojave Desert to the Eastern Shore of Virginia in 2007. We went from super-hot and dry to hot and humid. Whether or not it was the weather or the age of my dogs after the move, they seemed to tolerate hot and dry much better than hot and humid. Pupcicles went into continuous rotation in the freezer! Then I remembered the Kool Dogz and decided to order one. Best decision ever!

The Kool Dogz ice treat maker looks like this:

The components of a Kool Dogz Ice Treat Maker

There is a bucket (the mold) that allows you to easily combine whatever you want to add to the treat.  That bone-shaped thing attached to a bar is the centerpiece of the mold.  Once you get your stuff mixed, you place the centerpiece in the bucket with the bone to the bottom of the bucket.  There is a little hole in the bucket’s lid that the other end of the centerpiece fits through to hold it in place during freezing.

The empty bucket with centerpiece

LId of bucket/mold in place with centerpiece

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once frozen, you remove the lid and slide the ice block out of the bucket and place the end of the centerpiece opposite the bone into the center hole of the drip pan.  The fork screws into the bottom of the drip pan holder so that you can fix it into the earth.  Voila!  Long-lasting ice-treat for your dog!!!  You can freeze anything in this!  You can freeze food, treats and favorite toys that are small enough to fit in the bucket (Kong toys, ball toys, West Paw toys, etc.) in the mold.

Kool Dogz Ice Treat

Chompers and C.J. both loved the Kool Dogz!  However, they did not love it together.  If Chompers was working on the treat, C.J. would stay away.  Good boy, C.J.  If C.J. was at the treat, Chompers would come over to join in, but then C.J. would either move away from it (which was fine) or would lift his lip and warn Chompers not to come any closer (Jerk!).  To allow each dog equal time at the treat, I would let them out in shifts.  First Chompers (because he was older, wiser and not ever a jerk) for 5-10 minutes, then C.J. for 5-10 minutes.  This worked quite well for the first summer.

Chompers enjoying his Kool Dogz ice treat!

Chompers enjoying his ice treat while CJ lingers.

CJ during one of his Kool Dogz shifts!

The following summer I decided I should just have two of these things.  One for each dog and/or so that I could always have one in the freezer.  I first tried to order another through our direct account with Premier at the animal hospital.  They were out of stock.  So I went onto our other supplier’s website and they didn’t have them available either.  Next I went online to try to find one through Amazon, or Chewy or anywhere.  Nobody had them.  They were either listed as out of stock or unavailable.

Some time later we learned that Premier products had been taken over/bought out by another company called RadioPet.  The distributor explained at that time that, because of the change, some products were being discontinued.  Kool Dogz was one of those products.

Not long after Premier products became products of RadioPet, those products then became products of PetSafe.  When this change happened I thought I’d try to find the Kool Dogz (or anything remotely similar to it) again.  Nada.

Just this week the topic came up at work about Kool Dogz, likely because summer is approaching and we have had some lovely warm days in May.  In an effort to locate the product itself or something similar, we did a Google search of Kool Dogz.  Some of our newer peers didn’t know what it was we were seeking, so I clicked on the images tab in the Google search bar.  I didn’t have to scroll very far until I did a double take (which was really a quick scroll back on the mouse).  Something caught my eye.  When I scrolled back up, there it was.  My heart kind of melted a bit.

Chompers enjoying his Kool Dogz Ice Treat

That’s my late Chompers enjoying his Kool Dogz treat, circa 2013!  I’m not entirely sure on my timeline, but judging by his grizzle it has to be somewhere between 2012 and 2014.  His photo has been exploited on an Italian website promoting Ice Treats for dogs!  I’m totally fine with this.  I was quite … taken with emotion that he was chosen to represent this article.

But, now, I want to know WHY ON EARTH has PetSafe, or one of their competitors, NOT tried to recreate this product?!  It is so great!  I have tried to figure a way to rig something else up to duplicate it to no avail.  I have to admit that my  attempts have been lackluster since I do own a Kool Dogz (and I will be hanging on to it!).

I petition that PetSafe bring back Kool Dogz.  Who’s with me?