We’ve finally found our niche, Part IV … wrapping it all up

They’re really pretty short little blurbs, but if you need to catch up, check out Part I, Part II & Part III before proceeding. If you’ve been following along, continue on.

Not going to lie, 2016 and 2017 were pretty shitty (pardon my language, but that is the most appropriate term in my humble opinion), especially to Chris. We did finally sell our California house in 2016, but that was the only big positive thing that happened during that time.

In February of 2016, Chris lost his sister, Angela, to cancer. Then in May of 2017 his father passed away of a heart attack. Shortly thereafter he learned that his position at Wallops was being dissolved, and he would no longer have a job as of August 1, 2017. Then we got word about his mother passing in late September. It was a really rough, somber time for Chris and me.

After we returned home from Chris’ fathers funeral, we talked seriously about possibly moving back to the Midwest. We wanted to be closer to “home” mainly to be able to visit with Chris’ mom more frequently. She was by herself and wasn’t in the greatest of health, though you never would have known it if you were just meeting her for the first time. We figured we’d take a year or so to come up with a plan. Well, little did we know we wouldn’t have that much time.

Several months after Chris’ mom passed, things started to calm down a bit. We decided we did not want to move to the midwest, but would much rather stay here. Whether we are a stone’s throw from our family members or a thousand miles away, there’s nothing we can do to keep certain things from happening.  Chris found work at a local retail outfit that sold lawn equipment and repaired small engines.  It was something different, he was working with a close friend, and it was temporary.  He enjoyed it for the most part, but it just wasn’t him.  He actually tried to purchase the business at one point, but just couldn’t make it work.  The price being asked versus the profit the place made just wasn’t a good idea.  So he left there and moved on.

He’s currently working with a private carpenter, learning all kinds of new things.  Which is great given our current situation…

I am still working at the animal hospital, but have also been teaching a group exercise class at the local YMCA for the last 2 years.

About 5 years ago I became interested in group exercise.  I had already been running for several years and was working toward bettering my self in terms of my health and physical fitness.  I enjoyed (and still do) running, but needed something different.  I needed some other type of training to work on strength and flexibility.  I started taking some group exercise classes at a local boutique fitness center.  One of the classes I started taking was called Pound.  Oh my goodness, you talk about FUN!  And a killer workout too!  I enjoyed the class so much that I looked into what it would take to become certified to teach the class so that I could bring it to more people.

In March of 2015 I became a bonafide Pound Pro!  I taught classes at the same boutique studio that I was taking classes.

POUND Pro Training March 22, 2015 in Springfield, PA.

My POUND Posse shortly after becoming certified!

Not long after becoming certified for Pound, I learned about another pre-choreographed format of group fitness called SoulBody.  They offered two different types of a barre-inspired workout.  After looking into it I realized that it was right up my alley.  I looked into trainings to become an instructor and found a training being hosted in Bethany Beach, DE.  That was only a little more than an hour drive for me.  I signed up immediately.

In May of 2016 I became a certified SoulBody instructor and have been loving bringing this format to as many as possible.  I started at that little boutique studio.  After a few months, I wanted to do more, so I started to check in with other gyms and fitness centers.  I finally was able to convince the YMCA to bring SoulBody into their Group Exercise line up in 2017.

SoulBody Barre UNHITCHED March 2017

We have both come to love the Eastern Shore of Virginia, especially our little neck of the woods.  We live on a nice sized property in a very quiet, almost secluded area, surrounded by trees and agricultural fields.  Our community is very generous and friendly and we couldn’t imagine living anywhere else on the ESVA.  Once we decided we wanted to stay here for good, we started looking into buying the little piece of heaven we’ve been renting all these years.

On Tuesday July 16, 2019, at about 4:00 PM, the property became officially ours.  The rest of the story has yet to be written…..

2012 after Hurricane Sandy swept through.  She was a Tropical Storm by the time it reached us.

More of our Winter Wonderland!

Our little abode covered in snow.

CJ waiting for someone to toss his aerobie!

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We’ve finally found our niche, Part III … Embracing the Rural Life & wanting to make the ESVA our permanent Home

If you need to catch up, check out Part I and Part II before proceeding. Or just read on and if you get lost, I warned you…

Now Chris and I are both working full time. He was working at Wallops Flight Facility and I got a job at Atlantic Animal Hospital. He had a 30 minute (23 mile) commute, I had a 10 minute (4 miles out, 3 miles back) commute. His job paid a LOT more than mine and his hours were more flexible than mine so I couldn’t feel but so bad for him and his commute. Though he did realize it was a good thing that he could make a 23 mile drive in under 30 minutes. In California a 23 mile drive would’ve taken at least 45 minutes to an hour no matter where we were going.

I was home long enough with the dogs and cats before I started working to get them well acclimated to their new home and surroundings. Chompers and C.J. were both the most trustworthy dogs on the planet, so I never had to worry about them getting into anything they shouldn’t. I just worried about them chasing critters outdoors, especially at night, and that only happened when we were home with them.

PRODUCT PLUG: Noxgear Lighthound Vest has been a GODSEND for us since moving to the Eastern Shore of Virginia!

Esme sporting her Noxgear Lighthound vest during an evening stroll.

After being at the animal hospital for a few weeks, I had a conversation about the ticks in the area. My dogs were on Frontline Plus but I would still find numerous ticks on them, some were dying but several were engorged, enjoying a nice blood meal. One of my coworkers had suggested we get some chickens on the property. The chickens love to eat bugs, including ticks. Someone else had suggested we get guinea birds. Chris and I discussed it for a few weeks and decided on giving chickens a try. Before we even had a coop built I brought home a dozen little baby Silkies.

It took only a weekend to erect a small chicken coop. I came up with the design and Chris helped me build it. I thought I did pretty good considering I am not a carpenter.

Our first Chicken Coop. It was small, raised and completely enclosed. It served its purpose for a few years before we realized a few design flaws!

A few weeks after we brought home the biddies, they were ready to go to the coop. We confined them in the coop for about 2 weeks, then started letting them out to explore the yard during the days when we were home.

By early Spring the chickens were well acclimated to their home. We would let them out to free range when we were home, and they would return to their coop every evening. I had zero experience with raising chickens prior to bringing these home. I have to tell you, it was pretty easy to raise them from hatchlings to free rangers! I was not familiar with this particular breed of chicken either and thought they were the cutest things ever. They are a small, bantam type chicken with fluffy plumage. We called them our poodle chickens.

Our silkies were very friendly and personable, and loved a snack of stale bread or left-over French fries.

By late spring we started to notice that we were no longer finding ticks on our dogs or us. Then there was a little added bonus that started to appear in the coop…eggs!  And they were the best-tasting eggs we’ve ever had.  When we had extras we’d share with our friends and neighbors.  If we were going to be making a trip to the midwest to visit family, we were sure to bring eggs with us.  Chickens.  Who’d-a thunk it when we were leaving California…

In the years that followed, we both completely embraced the rural lifestyle of the Eastern Shore of Virginia.  We have met some very amazing, interesting, and wonderful people during our time here.  We had come to truly accept this as our home.  We felt at home.  We wanted it to be our permanent home.

Then things started to get a little rocky for Chris at Wallops.  His project was losing funding and he wasn’t sure whether or not his position would still exist when it was time for contract negotiations.  Every year he managed to still have employment!  Until the summer of 2017.  The project was no longer getting any funding.  At least not enough to keep him on it.  He got laid off.

…To be Continued…  Stay tuned!  And thanks for following along!

It’s HOT outside! Keep your pets safe from the heat…

It’s that time of year where it only takes a few minutes of activity for a dog’s body temperature to rise to a dangerous level. Please be mindful during the hot temperature days, especially those where the humidity levels are high. Even if you can easily tolerate a 5 mile run, remember that you A) aren’t wearing a fur coat and B) have sweat glands throughout your body! A dog’s only means for releasing body heat are through their paw pads, nose, and mouth through panting.

A few things to keep in mind:

  1. Always make sure your dog has plenty of fresh water available.
  2. Do NOT exercise your dog in extreme heat.  Take your dog for his or her daily walks before the sun comes up or after the sun has set, and keep them brief.
  3. Do NOT leave your dogs in the car.  If you have to leave the dogs unattended in the car, make sure you can do it safely with the vehicle running with the air conditioning on.  If you cannot do this, please leave your dog at home.  Read my previous article about leaving dogs in cars here.
  4. The obese, elderly, very young, and brachycephalic breeds (think short-nosed breeds like bull dogs, pugs, shih tzus, etc.) are at an increased risk of heat stroke.
  5. If your dog spends a lot of time outdoors, in addition to plenty of water, always make sure they have plenty of shade available in a well-ventilated area.  A dog house sitting in the middle of the yard in full sun is not appropriate.

Check out this article for more information about hyperthermia in dogs.

Esme & Gretchen had some fun in the sun earlier this summer, but we kept it short. Lots of breaks, plenty of water, and we took cover in the shade often.

Please keep your pets safe.  In the extreme heat, and always.

The DNA Results are In…

Actually, I knew the results before I posted.  But you all realized that if you read my original post.

C.J.

Since he was about 5 months of age, which is approximately how old he was when he came into our lives, C.J. has been classified as a Lab Mix. He looked like he might have some semblance of a bully in him too, and probably several other breed mixes. Labrador retriever was the primary, stand-out phenotype. Chompers, C.J.’s namesake, was half lab and C.J. looked like a spitting image of Chompers so we figured it must be so.

C.J. has been living a lie for the last 13 years of his life…

Here are C.J.’s Royal Canin GHA results:

CJ’s Genetic Health Analysis Report

A Labrador Retriever mix he is NOT!  There’s probably a tiny bit in there somewhere according to his “mixed breed” analysis.  C.J. is the poster child of what a Mutt is.  He is a little bit of this, a little bit of that, a dash of this, a sprinkle of that, and peppered with about a dozen other breeds.  The miniature poodle part though?  That gets me rolling!  It explains all of his “princess” moments.

How awesome is that report?  This Genetic Health Analysis screens for over 140 different hereditary conditions.  Not only do I now know that C.J. is a Pitweiler Choodle, but he also has tested clear of over 140 hereditary conditions.  That’s something that sets this pet owner’s mind at ease.

Esme

Then there’s Esme.  She was the reason I wanted to give the Royal Canin GHA a try.  Namely because she was so young, I was curious to find out what she really was because she had some really peculiar behaviors.  I suspected she had some bully in her due to her appearance and her personality, but she had something else that I just couldn’t figure out.

Well, you already know how good my intuition about dog breeds is knowing C.J.’s results. Lab mix.  Pshaw.

Esme is very stand-offish with most of the new people she meets.  She is fearful of others, and there’s no correlation to her fearful behavior (sex, nationality, age).  However, if she is allowed time to get to know someone, she then adores them whole-heartedly.  She is also the epitome of a snuggler.  She loves to be held in your lap, loves to lay next to and half-way on you when you’re laying down, and will curl up next to you while you’re chilling on the couch watching television or reading a book.  She has the appetite of a starving bear and will eat anything and everything she can get into her mouth, even if it’s not intended for ingestion.  And her tracking ability is amazing.  I really need to see if she’d be interested in Nosework because she can definitely sniff out any critter that has passed through our yard.

She was adopted to me as a Pointer mix.  I could buy that easily by appearance alone, but especially after getting to know her.  She has the personality of a pointer, always has to be busy doing something!  She gets bored easily and has all the energy in the world.  She also has pointed a few times.  Most pointers I’ve ever met have been very friendly and personable.  Esme, not so much.  Don’t get me wrong, she is friendly and personable, but she lacks trust in strangers.  She needs to spend a little time getting to know you before she’ll trust you.  But once you’ve earned her trust, she’s all yours.

So, what the heck is she?  Here are Esme’s Royal Canin GHA results:

Esme’s Genetic Health Analysis Report

So, there you have it.  Esme is mostly American Staffordshire Terrier (a pit bull) with a side of Wild Dog.  I’m beginning to understand her more and more!  Her trust issues?  Now it makes sense.  Her snuggaliciousness?  That’s all pit bull!

SIDE NOTE:  Pit Bull is a generic term for any of the bull terrier breeds.  It’s an umbrella term for a Staffordshire Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, Bull Terrier, etc.  The term “Pit Bull” comes from the fact that many of these breeds were used as pit fighting dogs.  Funny thing is, most of them were bred to be nannies.  Hence the cuddling.  They were bred to protect the young while the adults tended to the daily activities of the household.

Again, a neat thing about the Royal Canin Genetic Health Analysis is that it screens for 140+ genetic mutations/diseases.  Esme’s test came back with one copy of the craniomandibular osteopathy mutation.  I have learned that this is a dominant disorder, so only one copy is required to develop symptoms which means Esme could develop this disease.  Not all dogs with the mutation show clinical signs, but at least now my vet and I know what to watch out for.

How to get your dog tested

Check with your veterinarian to see if they offer the Royal Canin Genetic Health Analysis. The test requires a small blood sample and is reasonably priced compared to other DNA tests for dogs, and you get so much more than just what your dogs’ primary breeds are!  Even if you have a purebred dog, it’s worth it to have it screened for the 140+ genetic mutations.

If you have a:

  1. mixed breed dog
  2. dog that came to you as a stray
  3. rescue dog

I think you should seriously consider testing them.  Even if they appear to be a particular breed or breed mix, you might be surprised!  C.J. looked so much like a Labrador Retriever mix that I was certain he had to have some in him as a dominant breed.  His results just go to show that looks can be deceiving.  Just do it!  It’s kind of fun!

We’ve finally found our niche, Part II … From Urban to Rural with dogs

If you haven’t already, check out Part I before continuing. Or not.

As we turned down our little Neck that would lead us to our new home, my eyes widened and my jaw may have dropped a little bit.  It looked like heaven.  A house here, a field there and there and there, another house here, a thick grove of trees on both sides of the road, a little house there, another field, and then we came upon our little bungalow.  It was, and still is, the cutest little place on a property that is magnificent!  I could hardly wait to let the dogs out to run in this wide open area!  They already had some of that at my parents’ house, but this was home!  They would get to run here every day.  But…

…crap!  There are deer all over the place.  Foxes.  Raccoons, opossums, muskrats (all things my dogs would love to chase!)…and TICKS.  I already knew there’d be fleas and was prepared for them.  But the ticks.  Yikes.

I arrived, with the dogs and cats, to our new home in early December.  The weather was cool here, with highs in the 50s & 60s and lows in the 40s and 30s.  It was really pretty nice considering what it was like when we left Northern Illinois.  There were deer everywhere.  In the midwest we contend with deer all year long.  In California, we didn’t have to deal with deer, or many other wild mammals for that matter, at all.  Those critters stayed in the mountains and foothills near the area we lived.  When we’d go hiking in the foothills we’d come across a jack rabbit here and there, maybe evidence of a coyote, but otherwise all of the wildlife we’d happen upon was avian, arachnid or reptilian.

Neither ticks nor fleas, or mosquitoes for that matter, were an issue for us in the desert.  Probably one of only 4 good things about living in the desert, in my opinion.  We didn’t have to worry about flea and tick prevention, and heartworm prevention was not a top priority either.  I would keep some Frontline Plus on hand to use if I knew we’d be making a trek up the mountains or to the East.  I’d have Heartgard Plus on hand to use if we would be traveling to the midwest.

After being on the Eastern Shore of Virginia for one entire week I learned that I had trained my dogs well in terms of their recall.  Nearly every single time we would let them out to eliminate or explore, there would be some critter worth investigating.  All it took was a “EH!” and they’d stop dead in their tracks.  So the wildlife issue was not an issue at all.  But the tick issue?  We were not only finding ticks on our dogs, but we were picking them of off ourselves every day.  Yikes!  Thank goodness I stocked up on some Frontline Plus before I left California.  It worked well.  I’d find a few well-fed ticks on Chompers and C.J. every now and again, but mostly they were dead or dying.  But they’re still just freaking gross.  Chris found one on him one day in a place that you would’t go searching for one.  It freaked him out so much that he had me shave his head shortly afterward, worried that there might be ticks hiding in his mane.  He had long hair for the majority of our time in CA, got a decent hair cut just prior to his interview here in VA, but he had never ever had a complete buzz cut.  Welcome to the boonies city boy!

Chris already had a job lined up prior to our relocation.  I had sent out resumes to all of the local veterinary clinics once I learned we’d be moving.  I had gotten a response from only one of 5 veterinary clinics on the Eastern Shore before I left CA.  They wanted me to fill out an application.  Chris went and picked one up for me, as I was still in CA and wouldn’t be leaving for a few weeks.  He filled it out to the best of his ability.  When I finally arrived on the Eastern Shore, I called and scheduled an interview at the animal hospital.

Just a few days after I arrived I visited the animal hospital that I had been in contact with.  I had a nice tour of the facility, met all the staff and then sat and chatted with the practice owner for a few minutes.  It all seemed promising, then I was told they didn’t have any positions open at that time but they would keep my application on file for 6 months.  I was a bit bummed, but I still had plenty of unpacking to do to keep me busy for a little while.    It really was a shame because the practice was less than 3 miles from where we were renting.  It would have been an ideal place for me to work!  Alas, I had to keep searching.

A month had gone by and, though I wasn’t desperately in need of employment, I was ready for a job.  I had settled into the house, unpacked what was unpackable for the short term that we’d be living there, learned to navigate my way from home to all of the important places:  DMV, grocery story, post office, hardware store, etc.  I figured out right away that I’d be spending a LOT of time shopping on Amazon.  I continued to look for work that I might be able to tolerate.  My heart and soul wanted to continue to work in the animal care field, but after having been ignored or denied employment at every veterinary facility and animal care facility (SPCA & Animal Control) I started to pick up applications for factory work and retail work. Then I received a call from the animal hospital that seemed interested in me from the beginning.

There was a recent and unexpected opening at the animal hospital and they hit me up because of my experience (ie:  I wouldn’t require much training).  I hadn’t had any other offers at that point so I took the position…as a Receptionist.  Did I want to be a receptionist?  No, because I’m a technical person, not a people-person.  But I did know how to field phone calls and triage patients at the front desk quite well, and I really needed a job so I took it.  The pay was okay, and it was more than the nothing I had been making, so I was all in!

Something was meant to be, because I was a receptionist there for maybe 6 months until I got repositioned as a veterinary assistant.  I double-dutied for the longest time, but now am able to keep to the technical stuff more, which makes me happy-er.  I am still willing to fill in on occasion when needed as a customer service specialist.  Truth is, whether you’re a receptionist, a vet assistant, a licensed vet tech, or a veterinarian…you’re still a customer service specialist!  I just prefer that title to be lower on my list of responsibilities, if you get my drift.  I went into animal science for the animals.

Again, I digress.  So I got a job!  And it was something that made me happy.  I am still there, if that tells you anything.

To be continued…

Be Always Grateful

…Just a little food for thought post…

I wear many proverbial “hats,” as do most of us.

First and foremost I am Myself. I try to do ALL things for My Self. Not to sound selfish, but without caring for my personal self, I cannot truly be of any use to any business or any person if I don’t take good care of ME.  I am in no way perfect, but I do my best to lead a healthy lifestyle both physically and mentally.  I try to eat a healthy diet, I maintain an active lifestyle, and I take time to meditate as often as possible.  Sometimes I fall off the wagon.  Every now and again I drink more alcohol than I should, I eat more junk food than I should, and I fail to get in activity.  I try not to beat myself up over these failures, but I’m human and I do often chastise myself for being irresponsible when it comes to my self.  I think we all do it at times, but some more than others.

Second, I am a partner in a loving relationship.  Though we are not married, I love Christopher more than life itself.  He has been my #1 supporter for anything and everything I’ve ever done or tried to do.  Like any relationship, we have our ups and downs, backs and forths, highs and lows, but we get through it the best we can and continue to grow together every single day.

Third I am a coach and mentor. This hat envelops my long-time professional career and my more recent part-time hobby.  I enjoy teaching people and witnessing them grow and improve in their abilities.  It brings me great joy to witness someone evolving from struggling to mastering something.

Fourth, I am a pet-parent. I love, cherish, and adore learning more about my furkids every day!  I try to spend quality time with both of my dogs and my cat whenever I can.  (This is probably one of the primary reasons I’m such a horrible blogger…I like to play with my kids whenever I have free time!).  My goal in life is to be as good of a person as my pets already think that I am.

Lastly, I am an imperfect individual. Circumstances of my life have led me to this.  I am not perfect and I don’t try to be.  I have my own personal “issues” that I let get the best of me when I shouldn’t.  We are all working to be the best we can be, no matter what life throws at us.  I pride myself on my loyalty and honesty.  If I say I’m going to do something, I will do it.  If I offer to help you in any way, I’m not just saying it to appease you, I mean it.  If you want or need help and I am available, I am yours.  Sometimes I forget about a promise or commitment that I have made, but I’m also over 40 so that’s not surprising.

I’m babbling, but the main idea I wanted to hone in on here was that we are all different.  We all wear different “hats” and a varying number of them.  Our life situations and struggles are very different.  Each of us has characteristics that make us unique.  No matter who you are, where you’re from, or what you do, just always remember to be grateful for it.  Be grateful for being YOU.  Be grateful for the things you have.  Be grateful for the people in your life.  Be grateful for the experiences that have helped shape who you are.

“Learn to be thankful for what you already have, while you pursue all that you want.” ~Jim Rohn

We’ve finally found our niche…Part I

…or so we think and hope.

Since we met 23 years ago, Chris and I have lived in just a few different places. We spent some time in Omaha, Nebraska while he was in graduate school. Then we took off to Southern California where we spent 8 long years on the Western edge of the Mojave Desert. We have since found ourselves on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. We have been here now for 12 years and have come to love the area so much that we would love nothing more than to spend the rest of our days here.

When we were in California, Chris applied for, got and accepted a job at Wallops Island on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.  I had never been to Virginia but had heard of and read about such areas as the Blue Ridge Mountains, Richmond, Virginia Beach, Norfolk, and the entire Hampton Roads area.  I was less than thrilled to be moving into a “city.”

As chance would have it, we had a friend in California that was from the Eastern Shore of Virginia.  We started to ask him for some information about the area.  As it turns out, the “Eastern Shore” is actually a little peninsula that lies between the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean.  The area is very rural and riddled with agriculture and aquaculture.  I became very interested and wanted to learn more!  I didn’t have much time to learn about the area as Chris accepted the position and we were on our way from the West Coast to the East Coast in just a matter of a couple of months.

Chris left California and reported to work about 3 weeks before my departure from the West.  I was left behind to tie up all the loose ends; pack up the house, meet the movers, hire handymen to come in to finish all of our incomplete “home improvements,” get the house on the market, and so on.  Unfortunate for us, this relocation was happening right at the time of the last housing market crash.  We had a buyer initially, and all went well until the eleventh hour when their funding fell through and…no sale.  Thankfully these folks agreed to rent the house until they could make another attempt at purchasing the home.  We allowed this to happen because we didn’t want the house to sit vacant as we continued to pay a mortgage on it as it was losing value.  No worries, right?  That’s a whole other blog post…

After traveling far and wide with my riding partner, my adventurous Uncle Don (who flew out to CA, helped me finish up some final touches around the house for a couple of days, helped me pack what was left in the U-Haul trailer, and put up with me for about 3,000 miles), I made it to my parents’ house in Northern Illinois just before the Thanksgiving Holiday.  Chris flew out to join us for Thanksgiving.  Then he and I, Chompers, C.J., Penelope and Lazarus, finished the last leg of the move East together.

NO trip through the mountains between the months of October and April are ever going to be without some kind of weather hazard.  Well, we ended up spending the night in a parking lot outside a gas station somewhere in West Virginia/Western Maryland.  I cannot recollect the exact location, but I do remember looking for road signs for hotels and there were so few!  We saw one early on and, of course, they were NO VACANCY.  By the time we made it to this service station we were done risking the hills and winding roads while pulling a U-Haul trailer behind us!  Things got really cozy in the back of my 2001 Ford Escape with 2 big dogs and 2 cats!  We’d get up from a snooze every so often to turn the vehicle on and heat it up when needed, but we stayed relatively warm, but cramped.

The next morning we had breakfast at the little diner attached to the service station we used as a camp site.  The people were very friendly and the food was, well, it was a diner and it was breakfast.  It was eggs, bacon and toast.  Delicious always.

It took about 8 hours for us to get from our makeshift campsite to our NEW HOME on the Eastern Shore of Virginia!

I cannot lie, when we got to Annapolis and to the Bay Bridge, I was not convinced that we weren’t going to be living in a congested area.  I am not a city girl, I do not enjoy city living, and I was not about to go from where we were in Rosamond, CA to something more populated and ridiculous.  Chris assured me it would all change in just 20 minutes after we get over this ridiculously high and long bridge.  I’m glad he was driving at this point.

Wow, this post is going on a lot longer and in much more detail than I anticipated.  I think I’m going to have to do it in parts because, thinking about all of the happenings from where I started (in 2007) to today, a LOT has happened!  I’m having diarrhea of the typing fingers and thoughts I guess.  I digress…

Chris was right.  After we crossed the Chesapeake Bay Bridge from Annapolis to Kent Island, it only took about 15-20 minutes before civilization nearly ceased.  There were buildings here and there along Route 13, with some homes scattered along the way.  Whenever we were coming into a town there would be your little service station, maybe a restaurant/diner or two, and some other small businesses (used car dealer, pawn shop, thrift store, coffee shop, home store, … it was varied).  I was ecstatic!  THIS is what it was like growing up where I did!  I hated it as a child and young adult, but have learned to appreciate the serenity and sense of community as I’ve aged.  I couldn’t wait to see our new, temporary home!

We signed a 6 month lease on a property that we never saw in person, but we knew they were relatively close to Wallops Island, and dogs and cats were allowed.  We figured we’d only be there for a few months anyway.  After all, our house out West was in escrow.  After we take care of that we could look into buying something out here on the Eastern Shore.  We’d find an area we really like and start seeking properties for sale.

…to be continued…